Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

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Kit Craft
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Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by Kit Craft »

Suehiro Debado 320

Background:

These Debado stones seem to be rather unknown and I suppose that is because they were recently released, or at least that is what I have read on the suehiro site but it was translated and a catalog page. Anyway, these stones seem to be making a bit of a fuss in that there are a lot of people interested in them but few opinions floating around. Due to the graciousness of a member, nakneker (Sean), I have had the opportunity to use a few stones from this series and will try to demystify them. Honestly, they are not all that mysterious, standard good quality stones that you would expect from Suehiro.

Series notes: These stones all come with “nagura” or cleaning/dressing stones that are very coarse, very soft and very porous. While they do work to “dress” the stone in that you can rough up the surface or dislodge dried on swarf I would not suggest using the mud created by these nagura for sharpening as it will be of mixed grit.

I will add that the stones in this series come attached to a sheet of plastic, with a base that they fit into that has rubber feet and a holding tank where you can keep your nagura. This may sound odd but I love it. The base is great in that it does not move, at all, not even a little bit when you sharpen. Also, you can fill that base with water and flip the stone upside down to soak, if you so choose. Or you can carry it in the base, again, upside down for travel. But be careful because if you don’t make sure it is snapped in place the stones slip and I am sure you don’t want to drop it!

(I will add this blurb to the review page for all of these stones just in case as it applies to the entire series.)

Measurements: These stones were lightly used and then flattened by me so there will be a slight variance. Measurements rounded.

Stone only:

Length: 8 inches (203.2mm)
Width: 3 inches (76.2mm)
Thickness: 1 inch (25.4mm)
Weight: 33 ounces (940g)

Overall with base:

Length: 9 inches (228.6mm)
Width: 3.75 inches (95.25mm)
Thickness: 2.5 inches (63.5mm)
Weight: 39 ounces (1106g)

Feedback:

As with all of the stones in this series, this 320 Debado has immediate tactile feedback. That is to say that you will feel the edge of the edge click into place as soon as you have found your angle and there will be a sort of noticeable resistance when you begin to apply pressure in your desired sharpening direction. This is a very easy type of stone to “read”.

The feel that is often associated with tactile feedback is something that many, myself included, find just as important. In the case of this 320 I was surprised. I mean, it clearly feels like a coarse stone but that sandy/gritty feeling is toned down, even after building up a gritty mudd. So the overall feel is kind of like a harder sandstone but this is not a hard stone in general. In fact, it is a pretty soft stone, the softest in the series but hard and dense enough to resist gouging. However, this stone is fast to release abrasives so take that into account.

All in all I would say that in feel this might remind you of a 400-500 grit stone more than a 320 but it clearly cuts like a 320. It falls, in feel, directly between my pink brick 220 and latte 400.

One thing I will say is that if you go over your angle you will feel your blade slowly dig in and come to a stop. It is soft enough that you will gouge but not hard enough to bring you to a full stop. Because of this you can round your edges easily if you don’t pay attention. Well, maybe not as it is just going to cut a new angle, being a coarse stone and all.

Audible feedback is instant as well. It has a typical sandy “swish” to it. Not a scraping noise like many coarser stones. The sound reminds you of what you would hear from something like a Shapton pro 320 or even the 1k but amplified. Aggressive, apparent but not bothersome or overwhelming. This allows you to judge when you go over or under your angle easily as the pitch will change. It will scrape if you go over and it will make a “zizz” sound if you go under, like a tin can across pavement.

Visual feedback is interesting in that this stone hides the metal swarf in the mud when using a wide bevel and you can not see it at all. On a narrow bevel you will notice a thin line of metal painted across the stone from the first stroke. In fact, these look like fairly large metal shavings spread across the stone at first. When they start to pile up later it just looks like black ink. So while this stone does not scream “I am fast” it is a fast enough stone but that is not as apparent from the visuals.

Management:

Water management on this stone is easy enough as it is with the entire series. This stone is thirsty at first. In fact it needs a minimum of 10 minutes soaking in a tub or about 2-3 minutes under running water. You can use it before that but it will dry out immediately and the mud will become sand. If you saturate it well then you don’t have to worry about it as it will not dry out at all. It holds its water well. All you have to do is add water to wash off the swarf or mud, which you will have to do regularly for wide bevels.

I also want to note that this stone does not “load” with metal swarf if it is properly saturate. In fact, none of the stones in this series do. However, if you do not saturate them properly to begin with, they will all load and quickly. So make sure you manage that water!

Mud management is another story. On a narrow bevel, this stone isn’t so muddy so I’d not even worry about it. Plus it is so fast you will only be on it for a few strokes. (Fast because it is coarse so setting a bevel on a well maintained knife is easy.) However, on a wide bevel this thing will kick up loads, and loads of very sandy mud. This normally is not a problem and won’t wash out a well defined shinogi but it will ride up and scratch your KU if you have a weak KU or if you are off a hair, you will hit your finish on a non “true” wide bevel like my Tojiro, in fact, I did just that--hah. No, not intentionally, I had an oops moment. We all do, don’t we? Anyway, you will want to wash that mud away frequently if you don’t want it to ride up the blade face. Or at least keep it thinned out. Keeping it thinned out is the way I would go. I mean, it isn’t going to rip your cladding up but it will take a bit of KU if you are not careful.

Oh, and the mud is 99% stone here. Not inky swarf. Just sandy abrasive and binder.

Drying is something I have not touched base on often in these reviews because I use a lot of naturals and splash and go stones that do not get soaked at all. However, all stones should be given time to dry before you put them away lest they mold. What I will say is that this stone needs at least 72 hours to dry before you put it away. It is noticeably cold and wet for the first 24 hours and less so to the touch if not deceiving after 48 hours but if you set a paper atop the stone and come back in a few hours that paper will be saturated! After 72 hours you might notice some dampness on a new sheet of paper, you might not, I did but it was light. Still, to be safe I’d give this stone 3-4 days before packing it away. Not an issue for me as I store my stones in the open. Perma soaking may be an option but that is not my thing, these are not my stones and I won’t have them long enough to test that. Do so at your own risk. From what I understand these are vitrified stones so they should handle it just fine but that is your call.

I do want to add that these stones being slow to dry can be taken advantage of. If you sharpen daily these stones being partially saturated inside is a plus. Why is that, because they take less time to fully saturate or soak on the second round. Say you soaked them yesterday but left them out on the bar for the night, well it might have taken you ten minutes to soak the first day but you can do it in one the next. Hah, I guess this is just a happy accident.

Speed:

As I said, this is a quick stone that is a solid all round cutter. I’d not say it is the fastest stone in this range I have used but I don’t have too many others to do a side by side as low grit stones have a way of getting used up or simply sucking so you don’t keep them. It is not as fast as my pink brick, 220, which it shouldn’t be and it is faster than my Latte 400, which it should be. Honestly, it is right smack-dab in the middle. On a well formed but otherwise dull narrow bevel made of simple carbon you can get a tiny bur at about 4-5 single trailing strokes (again, assuming a thin edge--in my case a Gesshin Ginga in White #2 @ 61) and on some basic stainless in the same shape about 10-12 strokes (13c26 @61 Miyabi in my case). And anything between for other steels and thicker edges. Obviously it will take longer if you are thinning behind the edge.

It is quick with cladding and does not load or clog but does need flushed for the reasons noted above. This stone is about the right speed to do minor repairs, bevel resetting and thinning. For anything more than that I’d drop back to my pink brick or similar and maybe coarser. As a 1k replacement, for me it is simply too coarse. Not that it won’t work but I think you would be wasting too much steel too quickly.

Finesse:

There isn’t a lot to say here, it is a 320 through and through. Okay, so if you have never used a 320 or a coarse grit stone at all then it goes something like this. The edge left has a load of bite to it, very aggressive and very in your face. If properly deburred, even if you have to use some sort of alternative method like stropping on felt etc, you are left with a clean but very coarse edge. It will still tug at paper towel but should not tear it. It should cut paper easily, in a push, but will leave a less clean cut than you would expect from something like a 1k. Regardless, for its grit it is a clean edge.

You can do your tomato tricks, cut paper, shave (arm) hair if a bit uncomfortable at this stage (I’d not suggest shaving your face for sure). But this is not where I’d leave my edge and I like coarser edges.

Cosmetic finish is nicer than you would expect though. Scratchy on the cladding but nice and dark and good contrast is left between the core and the cladding and particularly iron. However, the scratches are uniform and not deep. They come out easily when followed by the 1k stone from this series and would come out even more easily with a faster 1k like a shapton, for example. This stone leaves a good foundation for a synthetic Kasumi if you follow with a stone that won’t completely erase your work. Likewise, if you want to simply polish out the scratches, that is easily done as well.

Hardness:

I don’t want to give anyone the wrong impression about this stone series and have them run out and buy the whole set based on my thoughts on this one stone (not that anyone would do that to begin with). That is not to say that you should not buy the set, it is a really good set of stones that I enjoy using, a lot. But I want to say that I don’t want to misinform you. These stones, in general are what I would call medium soft. Harder than king but softer, by far, than shapton. However, for its grit ratting this is not a super soft stone. It isn’t hard either. It is somewhere between, again, medium soft. However, the other stones in this series, while harder are comparatively softer to other stones in their grit range. I hope that makes sense. I will add that this stone is soft enough to cover up slight highs and lows that will later reveal themselves as you move up in grit. How do I know, well, it happened to me and I had to go back and fix them--heh. I will show this in photos along the way.

Dishing:

Due to this stone being a relatively soft stone it does dish fairly quickly. Not as fast as the pink brick I referenced before but not as slow as the latte 400 that I also referenced before. Right about where it should be. To put it into perspective, I did test the stone after light thinning. 20 minutes of accumulated use on a wide bevel and 10 minutes on a narrow bevel required this stone to be flattened for 6 minutes to get it 100% true (well, as true as possible by hand). Now, you really can get around that by working the highs and lows but I was asked to put these stones through their paces so that I could bring as much information to the table as possible. Again, to put things into perspective the latte 400, its closes counterpart in my current collection took just 3 minutes of flattening after the same use. So half the time.

So you have two options here, well three but two that are logical. You can do like Mr. Carter does and move around the stone once highs and lows develop or you can flatten after each use. Alternatively you could ride the rollercoaster but I don’t suggest that.

(Mind you, this is done with a heavily used CKTG 140 plate that is not in its prime. It is the plate I used on all of these stones so it should be a fair comparison but it is not as aggressive as it once was so maybe it will only take you 3-4 minutes, I have no idea. Just thought in the spirit of full disclosure that I would inform you of that.)

Value:

So, is this stone worth its price tag? Well, value is relative as we all know but I say it is a toss up. I do like this stone and like many things about it but is it worth $5 more than a Cerax 320, which is twice its size, probably not. $70 is not low cost for a stone of this grit level and it is a normal size stone at that and many are double or triple sized. I would, however, buy it over a shapton 320, for example. So its value is going to be left up to you to decide. I will say that it is a solid working stone of good quality though. So price aside, it is a stone worth having.

Vanity:

Yeah, it is mashed peas that have been resolidified.

Bottom line:

This is a good working, quick cutting stone that comes with a wonderful and easy to use and clean base, leaves a good cosmetic foundation and is simply easy to use due to its great and easy to read tactile feedback.

If feedback is an important thing to you, something you value above all else, then this is a good option for you. If you do a lot of minor repair or bevel re-sets then it is also a good stone for you.

However, if you are looking for a 1k replacement, this is not the stone for you. Also, it won’t be a match if you like splash and go either because splash and go it is not. It is also not a dry and go stone as it takes time to dry out, lots of it.

Notes: As I learned from my last review, on the Kitayama, people will use their stones differently for the same thing and of course for different things. To be prepared for such I did sharpen both carbon and stainless in both wide and narrow bevels and I took pictures of mud/swarf formation from both. But please note that I go all out when testing in that I use the stone for everything it is worth, I don’t do a few stropping strokes as if I were touching up a blade. I know that does not apply to the 320 but it might to other stones in this series.

For clarity, I start out with 2-4 pounds of pressure depending on if I want a bur or not (4 pounds on the 320 and 2 or less on the sequential stones) and I reduce it from there. As such you may see more or less swarf and mud production when your personal technique is applied.

Thanks for reading and I hope this proves helpful. Also, I’d like to thank Sean again for this opportunity.

(All caveats that relate to this series will hold true of each stone unless otherwise noted.)

I know this is a lot of text to sort through so thank you for taking the time to read it and I hope it is useful. Please feel free to ask any questions you may have.

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by Kit Craft »

I figured that a separate post for photos was needed beings the previous post was so lengthy.

In this photo you can see that the stone removes metal fairly quickly. This is the swarf you will see after about 1 pass (10 scrubbing motions starting at the tip and working my way to the heel with pressure only on the trailing stroke). Also, the steel used was 13c26 @ 61 hrc.

Image

Here is a photo after finishing the bevel set on the same knife, a narrow bevel at about 12dps. Total time spent on this stone was under 5 minutes for this knife. It sets a bevel quickly. It was simply, raise a burr and then reduce. So about 10 scrubbing motions per side and then 10x stropping motions per side reduced by 1 stroke per pass to flip the burr and then finally with as little pressure as possible 1x1 stropping motions until I feel the edge is ready for the next stone. In this case that was about 20, so 10x side.

Image

Here is an idea of the mud, with the consistency I prefer, after a single pass. You CAN make this mud much thicker and sandier if you let it build up but I don't suggest it. That is your call though. As you can see, it is fairly thin here but you should still be able to see that it is grainy and hides the metal swarf.

Image

This is a photo of the stock finish on my Zakuri Tosagata Bocho 165mm Blue # 1 that I bought specifically for testing these stones. (Mark, if you can pick these up, they are wonderful knives for the price! A stone testers dream, imo.) Anyway, this is simply to show you what I started with. Oh, and I switched over from the worn out Tojiro to this so that you could better see the contrast these stones leave as this has a more defined shinogi.

Image

As you can see from the photo, the cladding is a dark grey color with some fog to it but the core steel is a lighter matte color. This is a good foundation, though unnecessary if you have the right finisher, to a (faux?) kasumi. However, you can clearly see the scratches but they are easy to buff out on the next stone (a 1k) but I would NOT leave this finish on the blade road for any reason. I say that because it is semi rough and very grabby.

Image

Finished knife after being "opened" on the 320 (though a spot or two shows up later that I missed, rather this soft stone covered up. You will see that unfold in later reviews.).

Image

Here is the finish after an Imanishi latte 400 for comparison. At this angle you can not see a lot of difference, sorry about that, but I can say that the scratch patter is ever so slightly finer on the Imanishi, as it should be and the cladding is slightly less grabby. Otherwise, it is a comparable finish.

Image

I do have some more photos floating around on my pc if you want to see something, no harm in asking if I have it but I may or may not.

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by old onion »

Great review!

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by nakneker »

Nicely done Kit. Another in depth review loaded with info, both pros and cons. I look forward to seeing more on the other stones, especially the 3k which is my favorite of the bunch.
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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by salemj »

Nice review! My impression is that this stone is quite unremarkable (that doesn't mean bad), which makes for a difficult review to write, but you focused less on its comparative strengths and weaknesses and more on just "what it is," which turns out to be extremely useful even if it may seem a bit, well, ho-hum or par for the course.

I like what you say about price. Sometimes the question is how something performs, sometimes it is what it costs, and sometimes it is both. It is nice to read a clear opinion that the stone has value but that, for the price, many other stones probably have at least as much value.

To be clear: I'm not a huge fan of my SP 320 any more...but that has no influence of how I think of other Shapton stones (I still love my 1.5 and 2k SPs, for example). My guess is that the 320 has its place, and that the later reviews may clarify what that place may be by highlighting some of the consistencies among this new line while also singing the praises of some of the higher grits. So far, I already have a mental imagine of what the binding quality of this line may be and, if you'll forgive the pun, it seems an awful lot that that quality may in fact BE the binding agent...

Edit: I have to add that I'm a little surprised at the scratch pattern. Given the other qualities of the stone, I kinda expected above-average evenness and even something that would be "higher" in polish than the stated grit even though it is a faster cutter. But I guess this isn't the case, and the excellent Latte comparison makes that abundantly clear. Thanks for that.
~Joe

Comments: I'm short, a home cook, prefer lighter, thinner blades, and own mostly Konosukes but have used over a dozen brands.

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by Kit Craft »

Ray, thank you for taking the time to read and comment.

Sean, thank you again for the opportunity to try these stones out. I too like the 3k but I think the 1k is my favorite of the four. However, based on how the 1k works I think that the 1500 could be a very practical stone for many people. Of course that only holds true if it is more like a refined version of the 1k, which I would assume it is but you know how that goes...In fact, just based on the series as a whole I bet the 600 and 1500 would make a great pair, and particularly for someone like me who does not look for a lot of refinement.

Joe, this one actually came out fairly easily for me but the 1k, which is in rough draft just flowed as tends to be the case when you connect more with one stone than another. Not just the 320 but the stones in this line suffer from the same thing in my opinion, being priced out by other fairly similar stones. I do feel that these stones (as a series) have superior feedback and feel to many if not most of these other stones but the question that rings through is, is that difference worth the cost. However, I will get into that individually with each stone because I am willing to pay the up-charge with particular stones more readily than with the others.

Also, that Latte is simply a freakishly good value. It is almost unfair to the other stones in that sense, just like the rika 5k. Such stones promise a lot in value and they deliver in performance as well.

As always, thank you for taking the time to wade through my thoughts and add to them! It is helpful and appreciated. You seem to be able to pick out my tone better than I can myself at times too!

Edit: I would like to add that the addition of the well thought out base does add to the overall value of these stones. That is one thing I can not stress enough is how comfortable this series is to use and not from just a feedback standpoint. However, that, as much of what I say is personal preference.

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by nakneker »

Your welcome Kit, I was happy to send them your way and equally happy to see you run them through their paces. Thanks for taking the time to do it.
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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by salemj »

I'm glad you are emphasizing feedback. I don't know if you made the comment (I can't place it) or if I just made a false mental connection, but the relation between soaking and feedback (as a frequent but not necessary pairing) stuck out to me, especially in relation to my experience with the Rika 5k, but also in relation to my experience with some other stones (and the general observation that - contra the Rika - most lower-grit stones need more of a soak than higher grit ones).

The Rika has a very weird feel to me, but I'm very slowly learning to appreciate it more. Your reviews (past and this one) helped me to realize the potential advantage that the extra soaking and "damp chalk" feel/feedback can provide when sharpening, even if this is at the expense of a cleaner, glass-like feeling of precision. I am always annoyed at how the Rika takes water, mostly because by the time I get to that stone, it seems like a lot of soaking and annoyance for just a few, careful, delicate strokes...and then the thing has to dry out. However, if I work with rather than against the stone a bit more and really try to respond to the feedback and especially to the feeling of the bevel suck against the stone, I am rewarded with what feels like a more precise edge and maybe even a better microbevel polish.

Even though I tend to use coarser stones for repairs or rough work, I can see how someone who uses them with more precision might really prefer some of the "soakers" for certain jobs, especially when working with microbevels. It is all too easy to gravitate toward stones that feel "hard" and "precise" and that are true "splash and go," but it is important to remember that these traits are not the top of a pyramid; rather, they are a collection of traits that some great, convenient stones share, but other great stones share very different features, such as soaking periods, more feedback, more suck, and perhaps a bit more "sandy" or "particle" glide that can aid lighter pressure and more even scratch patterns (or more shallow ones). These have an important place in some collections, too. One thing I dislike about my SP 320 is the odd combination of "sandy glide" and "precision": I've learned that it cuts much better without mud, but I get annoyed that it tends to erode in such a way that it produces lovely mud that I want to use, almost as if it were more of a soaker and more of a sandy stone. This combination appeals to me less now...I think I'd prefer the stone to be either one or the other, but I have no other experience with very coarse stones, so I can't really compare it to anything except what I've ready about—say, the Pink Brink 220 on the one hand, and the Glass 500 on the other, which seem to represent the two extremes I'm referring to in ways that I'd probably prefer over the SP 320 "compromise." But for others, this "compromise" is exactly what they desire most out of a one-and-done stone in this particle range! I don't know...but it is fun to think about.
~Joe

Comments: I'm short, a home cook, prefer lighter, thinner blades, and own mostly Konosukes but have used over a dozen brands.

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by Kit Craft »

My pleasure, Sean. :)

Joe, I actually don't like that "clean, glass like feel" in a stone. :D Well, at least not when paired with something with lower tactile feedback in the sense of the stone being "slippery". I can deal with it in dense "rubbery" stones like many of the SP stones. I guess we can all be picky and that is why I like to separate feel from "feedback". Some call it the same, some make a distinction and some do other things but I like to get my point across clearly, which is hard, because I am a rambler by nature. Two stones can have that same "chalky" feel while one has better feedback or tactile sensation than the other. In fact, sometimes I will give up more immediate edge reading (feedback) for a better feel in use. :P (See, rambling.)

As for soaking, I like to make sure I give the stones enough time to saturate. I know some well respected people say that soaking the stone extra time does not do much with most formulations but I think that is taken out of context by many. You still want to soak the stone to the point of saturation. For me, if the stone continues to drink water, it is not saturated. If it never gets to the point where it stops taking in water, I want a different stone, period! These and other suehiro stones are good examples of what happens if you do not fully saturate as they you can see the water leach into the stone, the surface feels rubbery and they load. This totally changes when they reach saturation point.

Anyway, I get your point. As for the 320, I totally understand. I think, from the way you talk, that you would probably prefer stones like the Glass 500 and chosera 400. These are easy to like stones. Lower grit stones don't often present the issue of feedback as much either. Feel in use is another story but both of these feel like less coarse stones in use.

By the way. I forgot to mention something with these stones as a line. Not the 320 but the 1k, 3k and 6k felt waxy when I got them almost like they were lacquered. I had to flatten them to get rid of this feeling. No such feeling now, even between flattening. In fact, if you feel the sides of the stone they still feel like that. Not the first time a stone felt like it had a "Crust". But that could be me being picky or something else. If you use the Kitayama for a long time without flattening it seems to "glaze over" like this as well.

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by salemj »

Kit Craft wrote:
Wed Jun 27, 2018 9:43 am

Joe, I actually don't like that "clean, glass like feel" in a stone. :D Well, at least not when paired with something with lower tactile feedback in the sense of the stone being "slippery". I can deal with it in dense "rubbery" stones like many of the SP stones. I guess we can all be picky and that is why I like to separate feel from "feedback". Some call it the same, some make a distinction and some do other things but I like to get my point across clearly, which is hard, because I am a rambler by nature. Two stones can have that same "chalky" feel while one has better feedback or tactile sensation than the other. In fact, sometimes I will give up more immediate edge reading (feedback) for a better feel in use. :P (See, rambling.)
Totally get your drift. I didn't mean to conflate or combine impressions in that way, but more to make some stereotypical connections that are generally (but not always) true, such as the relationship between slower wear, "hardness" or "skating" feel, and requiring less water or soakage...but as you point out (and as I tried to), these are not "linked" such that you always get more of a skating feel with a harder stone and that this means less feedback and more precision, etc., etc. Quite the opposite when dealing with natural stones, in fact....it seems a bit more frequent that people are surprised by the unique combinations that natural stones bring to the table, and that these surprises highlight some of these more general consistencies/stereotypes in synthetic stones. Would you agree?
~Joe

Comments: I'm short, a home cook, prefer lighter, thinner blades, and own mostly Konosukes but have used over a dozen brands.

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by Kit Craft »

salemj wrote:
Wed Jun 27, 2018 10:08 am


Totally get your drift. I didn't mean to conflate or combine impressions in that way, but more to make some stereotypical connections that are generally (but not always) true, such as the relationship between slower wear, "hardness" or "skating" feel, and requiring less water or soakage...but as you point out (and as I tried to), these are not "linked" such that you always get more of a skating feel with a harder stone and that this means less feedback and more precision, etc., etc. Quite the opposite when dealing with natural stones, in fact....it seems a bit more frequent that people are surprised by the unique combinations that natural stones bring to the table, and that these surprises highlight some of these more general consistencies/stereotypes in synthetic stones. Would you agree?
Yes, that sounds about right to me.

Speaking of naturals, they can seem like quite a conundrum in a myriad of ways. For the better, imo. :) Thus the "this edge feels like an 8k but has the bite of a 1k" statements. Okay, that might be an extreme example, to an extent. :lol: I think it is time to play with some non Japanese naturals too.

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by nakneker »

If you play with some non J nats I hope you share. I use a Imperia-La-Roccia on my straight razors, basically a simple maintenance, SP 8k, La Roccia, strop, another round of the La Roccia and bam, shaving sharp. That’s per a Dr Matt video, I’d be interested in trying other stones on J knives.

I’m probably getting kinda weird about the whole stone thing. Here in Arizona we have many many Geological layers exposed, some of them are a dense sedimentary layers, I always drive by thinking about pulling over and checking them out for sharpening potential. I live next to the Peterfied Forest and know a guy with a very capable stone saw. 🙃
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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by Altadan »

nakneker wrote:
Sun Jul 01, 2018 12:57 pm
If you play with some non J nats I hope you share. I use a Imperia-La-Roccia on my straight razors, basically a simple maintenance, SP 8k, La Roccia, strop, another round of the La Roccia and bam, shaving sharp. That’s per a Dr Matt video, I’d be interested in trying other stones on J knives.

I’m probably getting kinda weird about the whole stone thing. Here in Arizona we have many many Geological layers exposed, some of them are a dense sedimentary layers, I always drive by thinking about pulling over and checking them out for sharpening potential. I live next to the Peterfied Forest and know a guy with a very capable stone saw. 🙃
Sean,
I came across this post after coming across the brand "Imperia La Roccia," wondering if anyone's ever tried on J-knives (more specifically, wide/single-bevels). Well? Have you?

Then I read on, and you speak about the sedimentary layers... man, I tell you, I've been day dreaming for months about traveling around pulling various rocks out. I've an idea or two of where to go... but I ain't telling till I do :mrgreen: Will probably need a Tojiro or two to spare, though..
“If we conquer our passions it is more from their weakness than from our strength.”
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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by old onion »

Altadan wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:44 pm
nakneker wrote:
Sun Jul 01, 2018 12:57 pm
If you play with some non J nats I hope you share. I use a Imperia-La-Roccia on my straight razors, basically a simple maintenance, SP 8k, La Roccia, strop, another round of the La Roccia and bam, shaving sharp. That’s per a Dr Matt video, I’d be interested in trying other stones on J knives.

I’m probably getting kinda weird about the whole stone thing. Here in Arizona we have many many Geological layers exposed, some of them are a dense sedimentary layers, I always drive by thinking about pulling over and checking them out for sharpening potential. I live next to the Peterfied Forest and know a guy with a very capable stone saw. 🙃
Sean,
I came across this post after coming across the brand "Imperia La Roccia," wondering if anyone's ever tried on J-knives (more specifically, wide/single-bevels). Well? Have you?

Then I read on, and you speak about the sedimentary layers... man, I tell you, I've been day dreaming for months about traveling around pulling various rocks out. I've an idea or two of where to go... but I ain't telling till I do :mrgreen: Will probably need a Tojiro or two to spare, though..
Careful Alt,I heard that T-Rex used to roam all over Texas.Don't wake up a sleeping giant. ;)

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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by Altadan »

old onion wrote:
Fri Sep 28, 2018 9:24 am
Altadan wrote:
Thu Sep 27, 2018 10:44 pm
nakneker wrote:
Sun Jul 01, 2018 12:57 pm
If you play with some non J nats I hope you share. I use a Imperia-La-Roccia on my straight razors, basically a simple maintenance, SP 8k, La Roccia, strop, another round of the La Roccia and bam, shaving sharp. That’s per a Dr Matt video, I’d be interested in trying other stones on J knives.

I’m probably getting kinda weird about the whole stone thing. Here in Arizona we have many many Geological layers exposed, some of them are a dense sedimentary layers, I always drive by thinking about pulling over and checking them out for sharpening potential. I live next to the Peterfied Forest and know a guy with a very capable stone saw. 🙃
Sean,
I came across this post after coming across the brand "Imperia La Roccia," wondering if anyone's ever tried on J-knives (more specifically, wide/single-bevels). Well? Have you?

Then I read on, and you speak about the sedimentary layers... man, I tell you, I've been day dreaming for months about traveling around pulling various rocks out. I've an idea or two of where to go... but I ain't telling till I do :mrgreen: Will probably need a Tojiro or two to spare, though..
Careful Alt,I heard that T-Rex used to roam all over Texas.Don't wake up a sleeping giant. ;)
Hahaha :)
Well, Dallas sits in a vast, broad, seemingly endless alluvium plains... it's all mud. Arkansas stone can be found 5 hours north-east (in Arkansas), or more hours south-west in the big bend...
Honestly, I was thinking of a few strata out in Israel, where I'm really from. I go back next year, and then that's that for "Free shipping over 60$" :lol:
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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by nakneker »

[/quote]

I haven’t used the La Roccia on a knife, I’m curious enough to try it though. That stone has its fan and others hate it according to Dr Matt on his video talking about straight razor maintenance. I love it, does exactly what the videos shows. I’ll try it and let you know.

As far as getting a local rock goes..... I’ve stopped a few times along the road and took a look. Most of the sedimentary rocks are too course. Then there is granite and volcanic rocks, both a no go. I haven’t found anything I think would even be hopeful I need to check a canyon I fish at every spring, if I remember right there maybe some fine dense sedimentary rock there. I hope I find something. I think it would fun and interesting to try it. I’m sure others have been down this road. When I google American whetstones I find a guy in Arizona who sells a three honing stones out of rocks he finds here in the desert. The reviews are good too. He’s very secretive and says it takes him a lot of time and work find the stones. Kinda cool though.
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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by Altadan »

nakneker wrote:
Fri Sep 28, 2018 11:33 am
I haven’t used the La Roccia on a knife, I’m curious enough to try it though. That stone has its fan and others hate it according to Dr Matt on his video talking about straight razor maintenance. I love it, does exactly what the videos shows. I’ll try it and let you know.

As far as getting a local rock goes..... I’ve stopped a few times along the road and took a look. Most of the sedimentary rocks are too course. Then there is granite and volcanic rocks, both a no go. I haven’t found anything I think would even be hopeful I need to check a canyon I fish at every spring, if I remember right there maybe some fine dense sedimentary rock there. I hope I find something. I think it would fun and interesting to try it. I’m sure others have been down this road. When I google American whetstones I find a guy in Arizona who sells a three honing stones out of rocks he finds here in the desert. The reviews are good too. He’s very secretive and says it takes him a lot of time and work find the stones. Kinda cool though.
[/quote]

That last remark about the fellow in the desert is really firing up my imagination again! Can you send me a link?
Ugh, I wish I had more geology in me. I only know enough to get me thinking, but not enough to show me the way.

I'd be curious as to what sort of polish the IRC would put on a wide\single bevel. Could you post some photos on a new post? Or PM me? :)
“If we conquer our passions it is more from their weakness than from our strength.”
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Re: Suehiro Debado 320 (No.400-SNE)

Post by nakneker »

Altadan wrote:
Sat Sep 29, 2018 2:25 pm
nakneker wrote:
Fri Sep 28, 2018 11:33 am
I haven’t used the La Roccia on a knife, I’m curious enough to try it though. That stone has its fan and others hate it according to Dr Matt on his video talking about straight razor maintenance. I love it, does exactly what the videos shows. I’ll try it and let you know.

As far as getting a local rock goes..... I’ve stopped a few times along the road and took a look. Most of the sedimentary rocks are too course. Then there is granite and volcanic rocks, both a no go. I haven’t found anything I think would even be hopeful I need to check a canyon I fish at every spring, if I remember right there maybe some fine dense sedimentary rock there. I hope I find something. I think it would fun and interesting to try it. I’m sure others have been down this road. When I google American whetstones I find a guy in Arizona who sells a three honing stones out of rocks he finds here in the desert. The reviews are good too. He’s very secretive and says it takes him a lot of time and work find the stones. Kinda cool though.
That last remark about the fellow in the desert is really firing up my imagination again! Can you send me a link?
Ugh, I wish I had more geology in me. I only know enough to get me thinking, but not enough to show me the way.

I'd be curious as to what sort of polish the IRC would put on a wide\single bevel. Could you post some photos on a new post? Or PM me? :)
[/quote]

It took me awhile to find the site that sells the stone found here in Arizona. I had stumbled on it about 6 months ago. It’s interesting. Here it is. Browse that site, it’s interesting. I wanna try one of the Apache red stones.

http://naturalhones.com/?page_id=1335
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